File PDF .it

Condividi facilmente i tuoi documenti PDF con i tuoi contatti, il Web e i Social network.

Inviare un file File manager Cassetta degli attrezzi Ricerca PDF Assistenza Contattaci



The Lunar Year of the Coligny Calendar a.pdf


Anteprima del file PDF the-lunar-year-of-the-coligny-calendar-a.pdf

Pagina 1 2 34526

Anteprima testo


TABLE 1: Using the verse to convert July 11 to a lunar date
Operation

Result

Add the day of the month less one ...

Today is July 11, so add 11 - 1 = 10:

4 + 10 = 14

If greater than thirty, take thirty away;

(not applicable)

22 - 0 = 22

Verse

From the start of March, count in months how far
it is to the month in which you are.

... and then, add the age of the moon when
March began.

The result is the age of the moon today.

From March 1 to July 1 there are 4 months:

March 1 was the 8th day of lunar March, so add 8:

4

14 + 8 = 22
22

That is: July 11 falls on the 22nd day of lunar July. We can check the result the
modern way:
1. July 11 always falls 132 days after March 1.
2. A lunar month (according to the moon’s phase) contains 29.531 days,
so 132 days contain 4.4699 lunar months, or 4 lunar months and 13.88
days, or (to the nearest whole day) 4 lunar months and 14 days.
3. March 1 was day 8 of lunar March, so adding 4 lunar months and 14
days will produce day 22 of lunar July.

The verse, then, has correctly converted the Roman calendar date into a lunar one.

Now let us take a simpler case, and suppose that March 1 fell on the 1st day of
lunar March, and that today is July 1. We recalculate, as shown in Table 2.
TABLE 2: Using the verse to convert a July 1 to a lunar date
Verse

From the start of March, count in months how far
it is to the month in which you are.

Add the day of the month less one ...

Operation

Result

Today is July 1, so add 1 - 1 = 0:

4+0=4

From March 1 to July 1 there are 4 months:

4

... and then add the age of the moon when March began. March 1 was the 1st day of lunar March, so add 1: 4 + 1 = 5
If greater than thirty, take thirty away;

The result is the age of the moon today.

(not applicable)

5–0=5
5

That is: July 1 falls on the 5th day of lunar July; while ‘5’ is one greater than the
number of months between March 1 and July 1.
In fact, by substituting any month for July in the preceding table, readers will find
that the final result is always one greater than the number of whole Roman
months since March 1, as shown in Table 3.

Furthermore: for this simple pattern to exist, these lunar months clearly must each
be one day shorter than their solar equivalents – a distinctive characteristic of the
‘lost’ Insular calendar, as mentioned earlier. In short: this nineteenth-century Irish

11